Reading on Friday 10 February

Looking ahead to the rugby on Sunday, this post at the Scottish Rugby Blog  considers how Scotland should go about beating France.  Very similar to a conversation I had yesterday – similar to the Racing 92 game, run France about until they are exhausted and then run around them.  

Of course that isn’t the only rugby game I am interested in this weekend.  Glasgow are back in action tonight, against Scarlets.  I was pleasantly surprised and, being honest, relieved to see the team, a lot stronger than I expected with so many players away on Scotland duty.

Oxfam’s Duncan Green never fails to make you think with his blog and this one on how organisations learn is no different.  His 2×2 contrasting size of idea vs alignment with the organisation’s current activities hits the nail on the head.  Evidence on its own is never going to effect change as there are too many vested interests in the current way of working.  This, for me, reinforces the need for senior “champions” for any significant change in an organisation.

This article on the wisdom and madness of crowds explains a recent paper which outlines a methodology that allows researchers to overcome the “herding” effect which stymies the wisdom of crowds.  I’m not going to lie, the maths behind it made me think of this:

I have written before about the insidious consequences of making public policy decisions about people based on religion.  Lo and behold, it looks as if my slippery slope prophecy is coming true – based on this article in the independent about latest moves to put political restrictions on Muslims.

With only a minor segue, this reading list about fascism by Tyler Cowen is pretty thorough.

Finally, the latest volume of translations of Whitehall jargon on Civil Service World – they are funny because they are true!

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